Passionate people inspiring children of future 2

Ryota KASAHARA
Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering Division, Tokyo University of Science

 
Article 04:“Something to tell”
 
 

If you want to do something, just do it.

“For the present” is sometimes important.

Sometimes it’s not bad to be swayed by those around you.

If you have a strong will power, any time people answer for you and the action would occur.
 

Since the great East Japan  earthquake, I have been to Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture twice for an investigation. The reason was simple: I just wanted to help people living in the same country. In Ishinomaki I met many people who had the same will and I got an opportunity to consider about the architecture that I currently study at university. I realized that act with strong will power helps a wonderful encounter and expansion of my would. I was touched by kindness and toughness of the victims (of the disaster affected areas) who smiled and engaged with us. There I learned what cannot be taught at the university.

In my volunteer work, I met with a man who is a fisherman. His fishing boat was washed away by Tsunami. “In the future, I will go fishing with my boat again.” He said stoutly. Every morning he repeats that to God 10 times.
“If you say ’10(= 十)’ times by “mouth(= 口)’ it will be “叶” by kanji which means dreams coming true. So I say it ever day.”

I feel that his words changed something within my mind.
Unexpected things, places, bonds influence and stimulate me.
People who bear the future should experience and try various things, and expand their possibilities.

 
 
 

Profile 02: Ryota Kasahara
 

 
Born in Ibaraki, currently living in Tokyo
 

Ryota is an undergraduate student of the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering Division, Tokyo University of Science. He is interested in urban architecture. In February 2012, Ryota came across the Fieldtrip project while he was conducting a survey and trying to figure out a way to stimulate the community through the power of art. He now works as an intern for the project and TOKYO SOURCE.

 
Likes:
– discovering interesting things in the everyday that you can find when you shift your perspective
– Unique and creative ideas that come about using familiar objects
– fashion, art museums, and cafés
Wishes:
– to take action that can help art become a part of one’s lifestyle

facebook:http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=logo#!/kasahara.ryota

Passionate people inspiring children of future 1: 03

By: TAKUMI FUKUOKA, School of Engineering at Tohoku University 

Article 02: “Do you know what TSUNAMI is?”

“The 3.11 Disaster = a Tsunami Disaster”

The term “Tsunami” has become familiar after the incident.

Then, what is Tsunami?

How is it different from other waves?

“Wave and Wave”

To begin with, I’ll tell you that there are 2 types of waves.

“Ocean wave” and “Tsunami.”

“Ocean wave” is a familiar one that you can always see at a beach.

The wind makes it on the sea surface.

How about “Tsunami”…?
It is explained below.

“Born Undersea”

Tsunami differs form ocean wave in birthplace.

Earthquakes and landslides can make large ground deformations undersea.

Then, sea surface rises and falls and waves will be born.

This is the beginning of Tsunami.

Tsunami born under sea propagates away in every direction.

“Propagates Half of the Globe in 1 Day and Grows Up”

A tsunami propagating velocity depends on a large part on a water depth.

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The average of sea depth is about 4,000m.

The tsunami whose velocity is equal to jet planes, and propagates to the opposite side of the earth in 1 day!

On the other hand, the shallower a sea depth is, the slower a tsunami velocity is.

Then, sea water is trapped and a tsunami height becomes higher.

As a result, a tsunami comes to land as the heavy water mass.

“Tsunami likes Train…??”

One of the characters of tsunami is “a longer wavelength”.

In the other words, once a tsunami breaks on the shore, it doesn’t retreat for a while.

The wavelength of an ocean wave is a few seconds.

However, one of a tsunami is about an hour, and all this time tsunami keeps surging!!

Can you understand differences between “ocean wave” and “tsunami”?

There is a following parable,

“Ocean wave is likened to cars, tsunami is likened to a train”.

While ocean wave is a low of little waves, tsunami is water mess flowing continuously.

Even if their wave heights are same, they are nothing like each other.

Tsunami has much larger quantity of water and energy than ocean wave.

Just 50cm height the tsunami can wash away human bodies.

Do you imagine “tsunami”?

Do you understand how it differs from other waves?

It is important to imagine waves, to study about tsunami.

This is all for this time and you did a good job.

Next time, we’ll consider about the 3.11 disaster through studying about tsunami damages.

Profile 01: Takumi Fukuoka http://twitter.com/#!/zon_dag

Born and raised in Tokyo, currently living in Miyagi prefecture.

Studying Tsunami disaster technology at Tohoku University.
Theme: Extracting Tsunami Impact by Remote Sensing

Participated in “Workshop on the post-disaster reconstruction of Kamaishi city (led by Japanese architect Toyo Ito),” “9th International Workshop on Remote Sensing for Disaster Response (at Stanford University, US)” Joined DAICHI Projects since December 2011 when encountering “Tsumugiya,” an industrial recovery project based in Ishinomaki city.

Prefers red.
Prefers to play music rather than listening.
Likes to draw portraits.
Likes to go for a long bike ride.
in the same manner, likes to walk around neibourhood.

Likes to having dialogues with people and watching them smile. It gives him energy.

Short story written by Leila Moslemi Mehni

Bam, Iran, 2003

 

Thousands collapsed

with the citadel.

Palm trees fell

hands buried under the ground.

 

The earth had no complaint—

having  swallowed so much.

In the destruction

all I could see was dust.

 

In memory of the dead,

brides gave away

their gold to survivors.

 

Children will be born,

and I will rebuild you,

I promise.

 

It was some time around afternoon on one of the coldest days of winter in 2003. I was drawing and taking photos of the ruins of the henna factory in Bam. The city of Bam is one of the small towns in the province of Kerman, south of Iran. This modern city embraced an ancient citadel, Arg-e Bam. The old city of Bam was not neglected by the new citizens. It was a tourist attraction for thousands of people from around the world. However, this glorious architecture was reduced to rubble by the anger of Mother Nature, in the form of an earthquake that led to the death of over 30,000 people in the new city. There had been no earthquakes of that magnitude in the region for about 2200 years.

Later, in the evening I had to report my observations of the destruction to my manager in the meeting for purposes of archiving. I was a volunteer student with the cultural heritage project. As I was scrutinizing my surroundings, I heard a sound. A tiny little girl was slowly heading towards me. The harsh desert sun with the dust in the air gave me a hazy impression of her. As she approached, her disheveled appearance drew my attention. She had big slippers, and her clothes were too big for her, betraying her homelessness and loneliness. Later on, I found that she had lost over 80 members of her family and relatives. Her little hands reached up to her scarf in an effort to make herself presentable. When close enough, she asked: ”what are you drawing?” And, from that moment, we were connected. I got down on my knees in front of her and took my mask off and said: ”I am drawing this building.”

“Do you want to draw something?” I asked.

“Yes,” she said, and looked at me.

Her name was Zohreh. We sat on the ground and shared ideas about what to draw. She said: ”I want to draw Bam.” By that moment, I realized that there was a group of children around me asking for pen and paper to draw. One of them brought a box of coloured pencils from the camp where they lived.  She gave me her drawing and told me: ”I had never had a chance to climb to the top of the citadel, and now this wish is never going to come true.” I saw the regret in her eyes. At the end, I had a handful of paintings gifted to me by the children.

We then formed a circle and played with a small plastic ball together, my friends joining us in the middle of the game. I did not know how I got involved with those children. Zohreh invited me to the tent that was her residence. I went inside with all the children. They would not leave me alone. I was like a string that connected those scattered beads together. I wished I had that necklace for myself. Zohreh’s mother was the only other survivor from among their family. She showed me their family album and talked in a resigned voice about her past. Her grief came through her voice. She did not complain but stared at an indeterminate point ahead of her. I did not know how to respond.  My silence invited her to share the burden she could not bring herself to share with anyone else, and possibly to heal her suffering. I was as silent as breeze in presence of her sadness. She was broken. I left the tent in wonder. I could do nothing more.

That day, it did not take me long to add another story to the book of my life.  Not all the chapters are on blessings and bliss. My memory of Bam is that of heartbreaking reverence and awe. I could have been one of the victims, dead or mourning my dear ones. I have Zoher’s drawing hanging on my wall, reminding me, “Hey Leila, you made those people happy for a while by sharing your time.”

 
 

This is short story written by Leila Moslemi Mehni and edited by Roghyeh Ghanbaralizadeh (Banoo Zan) from Iran. Leila was a museum studies student in 2003. She spent a month as a volunteer in Cultural Heritage Camp in city of Bam in province of Kerman, Iran.

 
 

This Zohreh’s drawing from Arg e Bam.

 
 

I have worn the mask because I caught a very bad cold. Zohreh is the fourth person standing from the left. She was 11 years old at that time .

 
 


This drawing belongs to the other girl named Zeynab,the fifth person standing from left beside Zohreh.This drawing belongs to the other girl named Zeynab,the fifth person standing from left beside Zohreh.

 
 

This drawing belongs to the other girl named Zeynab,the fifth person standing from left beside Zohreh. 4-Back of Zeynab’s drawing . She has drawn Hossein with a flower in his hand, the little boy in the picture. She has recalled what has happen to her on the night before earthquake in few sentences that she has written. She has written how her brother and his wife came to their house and brought a box full of oranges. After, his brother left their home and took some oranges to Zeynab’s sister house. She has mentioned her brother was in compulsory military services. He went shopping and bought a pearl’s neckless.

Passionate people inspiring children of future 1: 02

By: TAKUMI FUKUOKA, School of Engineering at Tohoku University 
 
Article 02: What are “Disasters” exactly?
 

How do you picture disasters in your mind?
Earthquakes? Floods? Typhoons??
Do you know for certain what disaster is about?
Here, let’s study about it!

Disasters fall into 2 categories.
“Natural disaster” and “Man-made disaster”

By the way, can you answer the following question.
Q) There was a construction in a mountain. Unfortunately, a landslide was caused while at work. Then, is it A. a “Natural disaster” or B. a “Man-made disaster”?

The answer is not as simple as A. or B. It has additional aspects to it.

A) We need to focus on 2 points. Two additional questions;

1. Anything damaged or not?
2. What caused of damage?

1. Without a damage on things or people, it’s not called a disaster. It is a “Natural phenomenon.” It’s a “Disaster” only with damages.

2. When the landslide is caused by the construction, then it’s a “Man-made disaster.” When no association with the construction, then it’s a “Natural disaster.”

“Natural phenomena” cause “Natural disasters,” and “Human activities” cause “Man-made disasters.”

You clearly understand what disasters are, don’t you?
Well, let’s make it more concrete.

Natural disasters are that natural phenomena cause damages to human communities.
I will show you many kinds of natural phenomena causing damage in 4 groups.

【Geological】
Earthquake, landslide, and volcanic eruption. They are underground or mountain disasters. Also tsunami or fire accompanied with them are in this group.

【Meteorological】
Abnormal weathers; heavy rain and snowstorm, following flood and snow avalanche, thunder and drought, tornado and typhoon, and big wave…etc. They cause upon us from not only the sky but also seas and rivers.

【Biological】
Creatures linked disasters. You’ll be surprised that epidemic is one of disasters.

【Astronomical】
Meteoric stone and radiation cause damage to us from space…!!

I can only show so many disaster and disaster and disaster… We are surrounded by various disasters like these.

How do you feel now? You may have become closer to disasters.
At the next column, we’ll focus on “TSUNAMI,” claimed many lives in the 3.11 disaster.

 

 

 

Profile 01: Takumi Fukuoka http://twitter.com/#!/zon_dag

Born and raised in Tokyo, currently living in Miyagi prefecture.

Studying Tsunami disaster technology at Tohoku University.
Theme: Extracting Tsunami Impact by Remote Sensing

Participated in “Workshop on the post-disaster reconstruction of Kamaishi city (led by Japanese architect Toyo Ito),” “9th International Workshop on Remote Sensing for Disaster Response (at Stanford University, US)” Joined DAICHI Projects since December 2011 when encountering “Tsumugiya,” an industrial recovery project based in Ishinomaki city.

Prefers red.
Prefers to play music rather than listening.
Likes to draw portraits.
Likes to go for a long bike ride.
in the same manner, likes to walk around neibourhood.

Likes to having dialogues with people and watching them smile. It gives him energy.

Passionate people inspiring children of future 1: 01

By: TAKUMI FUKUOKA, School of Engineering at Tohoku University 
 
Article 01: To The Future Town
 

On 11 March 2011, Japan faced the large disaster.

Tsunami, accompanied with the earthquake, washed away whole Pacific towns in Tohoku and Kanto regions.

Towns disappear.

In other words, regular days are lost.

Family and home, friends and school, tomorrow and yesterday, all of them are lost.

But the future has not disappeared yet.

It is so acquired to reconstruct and cultivate lost towns.

When it is starting, now is the most important and precious time.

Creating a town is creating a future.

Well, let’s think about this disaster.

Let’s picture “the feature town” with your infinite possibilities.

 

 

 

Profile 01: Takumi Fukuoka http://twitter.com/#!/zon_dag

Born and raised in Tokyo, currently living in Miyagi prefecture.

Studying Tsunami disaster technology at Tohoku University.
Theme: Extracting Tsunami Impact by Remote Sensing

Participated in “Workshop on the post-disaster reconstruction of Kamaishi city (led by Japanese architect Toyo Ito),” “9th International Workshop on Remote Sensing for Disaster Response (at Stanford University, US)” Joined DAICHI Projects since December 2011 when encountering “Tsumugiya,” an industrial recovery project based in Ishinomaki city.

Prefers red.
Prefers to play music rather than listening.
Likes to draw portraits.
Likes to go for a long bike ride.
in the same manner, likes to walk around neibourhood.

Likes to having dialogues with people and watching them smile. It gives him energy.


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